Altoids Mini Survival Kits: A Dumb Idea?

There's a pattern that I've seen lately. Mini houses. Individuals are constructing full blown houses on boat sized trailer frames and dragging them around the country.

Survival kits are going in the exact same instructions. Recently I've been seeing numerous resources devoted to Altoids mini kits. I think what draws individuals to these mini kits is the appeal of aiming to make something smaller and smaller.

They say that a Personal survival gear bags or PSK is easy to toss into your automobile or brief-case. And it feels excellent understanding you have a "survival kit" on you always.

However do you actually believe a sardine can will hold a survival kit? I do not think it will. I think mini survival kits are sort of goofy. The contents are normally low-cost. Yeah, frequently you'll see some fishing hooks thrown in to make you seem like you're going to capture some fish. But what about shelter, heat, fire or cleansed water?

So let's explore this concept further. And along the way, I'll give you an enhancement with each bad concept. Let's jump in!

BAD IDEA # 1: ALTOIDS SHELTER

You could make or buy one. No shelter of any value will fit in the container. Simply mentioned, the kit is too little.

Do you think you're going to fit a space blanket in an altoids box survival kit can? Nope. A second example is ultra light material. Even something as light-weight as Tyvek will not fit in a small tin.

MUCH BETTER IDEA # 1: A CONNECTION CAN

Try using a tin to come with paracord and duct tape. If you discover products along the way, you have the cord and tape to attach things together.

BAD IDEA # 2: ALTOIDS HEAT

For heat to exist in a survival kit you need fire starting gear. And if you are lucky you'll fit a small striker or magnesium bar. And to include insult to injury, the tin isn't water resistant.

BETTER IDEA # 2: TINDER TIN

Instead of trying to bring all of your fire making gear in a tin, come with simply the tinder. Make it a tinder tin.

BAD IDEA # 3: ALTOIDS FOOD

That won't fit. Food isn't going to work here.

MUCH BETTER IDEA # 3: COOKING CAN

Use the tin as a range rather. For instance you can cook bread in 10-15 minutes with self rising flour, water, salt and a bit of oil. Produce a dough ball. Lightly sprinkle the tin interior with dry flour. Start cooking with the lid up. At the 12 minute point, put a toothpick in. If it comes out dry, you're done!

BAD IDEA # 4: ALTOIDS WATER

You wont be coming with around liters of water here. Water filters aren't small adequate to be stuffed into an Altoids tin. In the end, possibly you can fit some water tablets.

MUCH BETTER IDEA # 4: BABY BOILER

Boil water in the tin can. Bottom line is to put together the things you'll need, and let the contents dictate the size of the container you'll be making use of.

Focus instead by yourself needs. Satisfy them with the least pricey and lightest/smallest package possible.

7 Instantaneous Survival Shelters: From Home Wrap To Trash Bags

With immediate camping tents or tarpaulins, some people get slowed down in useless information. They get sucked into edge seaming, waterproofing and other details.

They are missing an unique component in these shelters. It's a camping tent.

After reading this short article, you'll be able to prepare your very own instant survival shelter from these basic ideas.

SHELTER # 1 - 2 SECOND TENTS

Its a genuine camping tent with fiberglass rods, UV protective finish, but it increases rapidly. One of the best ones is the Quechua's 2 2nd tent. You simply throw this camping tent and it sets itself up. Yeah, its crazy.

The drawback? It collapses into a ring form. That suggests there's a possibility it might not fit into your little survival kit.

SHELTER # 2 - TYVEK SHELTERS

You just take Tyvek or house wrap and turn it into a tarpaulin or a tent. House wrap is light, waterproof and in some cases washable. One good benefit if using house wrap is that you can personalize your Tyvek sheets with Tyvek tape, seam sealant and grommets.

SHELTER # 3 - INSTANT TUBE TENTS

A tube tent is easy. Tube camping tents have an advantage over a simple fly sheet because of the floor. If you go to Amazon you can discover tube tents that load into the size of a fat wallet.

SHELTER # 4 - PONCHO TENT/TARP

You don't generally think of a poncho as shelter. An easy poncho and 2 shock corded poles can create something astonishingly reliable. Take the 2nd shock corded pole and link the opposite ends.

SHELTER # 5 - TRASH BAGS

A simple, large garbage bag can serve as an alternative survival shelter. If you desire an estate sized trash bag shelter, go to Amazon and get the 95 gallon bags. Cut the bottoms out of 2 bags, and then tape the bags together end to end for a tube camping tent.

SHELTER # 6 - BEDSHEETS

Bedsheets aren't as water resistant as a 4mm trash can, but they can serve well as a tarp or covering. Several bedsheets layered over one another produce air barriers. By developing an air barrier between the sheets, you enhance the opportunities of keeping warm. Add some paracord to the mix and you can tie the corners to branches and make a survival tarp.

SHELTER # 7 - PLASTIC SHEETS

Remember the 4mm garbage bags we just talked about? The 4mm plastic also comes in sheets. You can get them at hardware stores and they are available in rolls. Cut off whatever you need for shelter. Its affordable and waterproof. Or if you divided the end open you'll have a 6 x 8 foot tarpaulin.